The Marvelous Taejongdae Park – A Must See in Busan

How to go to Taejongdae

Taejongdae is known for its seascapes and landscapes. It is designated as a Busan Monument. Taejongdae is a natural park with lush evergreens, which includes 200 types of trees and stunning coastal cliffs facing the blue-greenish ocean waters. Named after King Taejong of Silla, this place is one heck of a geological and historical wonder.

Taejongdae Park won our hearts. Among the places we’ve visited in Busan, it is indisputably the best by far. We had expected the astonishing sights, but we were awe struck by the tales that runs deep in the place. Setting foot on the coastal walking trails along the rocky cliffs of Taejongdae is certainly one for the books.

Taejongdae Park
The whole park is HUGE, there are various sights and activities all throughout the island. Visitors have an option to go around on foot or via train-ish vehicle called Danubi. Of course Feb and I, being the fitness buffs that we are, opted to ride the vehicle (lol). The vehicle has five stops along its route, but we only had our eyes on Yeongdo Lighthouse.
Taejongdae Park
Taejongdae Park

Yeongdo Lighthouse

Yeongdo Lighthouse

To reach the lighthouse from the stop, we had to walk down a fairly long flights of stairs. Along the way down, there’s one more prominent figure we were excited to see. It is the huge blue and red circular thingy with sort-of-a-metal-arrow in the middle. We’ve learned that this structure is called “Light Beyond Limitation”. The arrow was said to be pointing towards Japan.
Taejongdae Park

Light Beyond Limitation

Light Beyond Limitation

Taejongdae Park

History enthusiasts and oceanophiles alike will totally love this place. The emerald waves’ rolling over the amazingly shaped rocks is insanely calming. And oh, you have to hear the stories surrounding each rock formation; some are enchanting, some are melancholy, some are appalling but mostly fascinating.

There’s a broad flat rock formation that was named ‘Suicide Rock’ because of numbers of people who have jumped off of its cliffs. It was said that the suicide rate in this area in the past was relatively high that even putting on a sign that says ‘do not commit suicide’ didn’t lessen it. Because of this sad problem, the local government had installed a more powerful statement. Mosajang (not pictured) a statue of a mother holding 2 children which meaning is appreciating lives by being reminded of the mother’s love. It maybe a miracle, but after installing the statue on 1976, suicide incidents became rare to none in this place.
Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park Suicide Rock

There’s also a myth that gods and goddesses came down from heavens to the rock under the lighthouse to relax, thus they named the rock Sinseon. At this rock, there is a figure called Mangbuseok. It was named after the story of a wife who died waiting for her husband to come back after he had been taken to Japan. I even read somewhere that they found a dinosaur footprint (gasp) that dates back to the Cretaceous Period near Sinseon Rock.

Sinseon Rock

Mangbuseok and Sinseon Rock

That’s Tea Kettle Island (Jujeonjal) on the upper left.

Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park

La Febie

Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park

The traversing pathways and steep stairs on the way to the rocks, though intimidating will be all worth it. The therapeutic ocean is another thing but learning about these tales makes walking along this nature’s glorious mess more surreal and meaningful. Isn’t this what travel is all about? Looking beyond what’s right in front of you. It makes you realize no matter how much you know, there’s always more to learn.

Yeongdo Lighthouse

The rock under the lighthouse is called Sinseonam, it was formed 120,000 years ago.

Taejongdae Park
Taejongdae Park

You can buy fresh seafoods direct from the divers and eat on these tables.

Taejongdae Park

Taejongdae Park
Directions:
Take subway line 1 to Nampo Station, exit 6. Take either Bus 8, 30, 66, or 88 and get off at the last stop (Taejongdae Chagoji). OR
Take subway line 1 to Busan Station, exit 7. Take either Bus 66, 88, or 101 and get off at the last stop (Taejongdae Chagoji).
The bus ride is about 40-45 minutes; you can take the same bus going back.

More of Busan on my next posts. 🙂

xoxo

 

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